Archives pour la catégorie Manifestations

COLLOQUE – 1er & 2 FÉVRIER, BIOSPHERE 2, ARIZONA. « BIOCOSMOS – OUR SENSE OF PLACE, OUR SENSE OF LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE”

CNRS-ENS-UA International Research Center iGLOBES
and
Paris Sciences & Lettres Research University
Interdisciplinary Program on Origin and Conditions of Appearance of Life

« BIOCOSMOS – Our Sense of Place, Our Sense of Life in the Universe”

Workshop organized at the University of Arizona by Dr. Perig Pitrou (Collège de France/PSL Research University, Paris), Dr. Istvan Praet (University of Roehampton, London), Dr. Regis Ferriere (University of Arizona and ENS/PSL Research University, Paris) and Dr. Kevin Bonine (University of Arizona)

Télécharger le programme

February 1-2, 2018, at Biosphere 2

Planet scientists and exoplanet astronomers are re-shaping our understanding of the universe, presenting a fascinating cosmos filled with places and destinations, not an empty void. At the same time, Earth physicists and biologists design models of self-sustainable ecosystems such as Biosphere 2 and the Lunar Greenhouse, with the goal of engineering bio-regenerative mini-worlds that can function on their own. As these scientific revolutions unfold, with distant spaces and global life systems as objects of “field work”, what counts as the “human environment”? How do we, as individuals and societies, relate to spaces, things, and processes we do not or cannot experience directly and which we see as “extreme” or “beyond” human? As scientists study these distant spaces and global processes, how do their findings transform our understanding of what it means to be in the world? How do inquiry and insight change our outer space imagination and the way we comprehend Earth on a whole, planetary scale? Will all this impact how our societies confront today’s environmental challenges?

Tackling these big questions requires off-the-beaten-path dialogue among anthropologists, space scientists, and Earth system researchers. To promote this conversation, the International Research Center iGLOBES (CNRS-UA-ENS UMI 3157) and Paris Sciences & Lettres Research University (Program OCAV, Origins and Conditions of Appearance of Life) organize a two-day workshop at Biosphere 2, on February 1-2, 2018.

To attend please register
by sending an email to Ms. Ruth Gosset at rgosset@email.arizona.edu
with your name, department, institution, day(s) you plan to attend.

Day 1 (Thursday, February 1) will be devoted to the question of how we, humans, use our perception and understanding of life and nature on global Earth to design, engineer and use ‘mini-worlds’ – miniaturized artificial ecosystems that can function on their own and help us meet some of our most pressing global challenges, such as food production, climate control, clean water, and safe energy beyond current environmental or economic limits.

Location: MOJAVE ROOM

8:30-9:00              Welcome coffee/tea

9:00-9:15              Opening remarks by workshop organizers.

9:15-10:15          John Adams (UA Biosphere 2)

Biosphere 2: Concept, reality, implications

10:15-11:15       Peter Troch (UA Hydrology & Biosphere 2)

Experimenting on the Earth system with LEO

11:15-12:15       Gene Giacomelli (UA Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering) The Mars/Lunar Greenhouse: From Design to Function

12:15-1:00           Break

1:00-1:45             Perig Pitrou (Collège de France/Paris Sciences-Lettres University)

Life as a Making: Modeling, Miniaturization and Figuration of Living Systems

1:45-2:00             Coffee break

2:00-4:30             Doctoral and Post-Doctoral Session moderated by Joffrey Becker (Collège de France/Paris Sciences-Lettres University): Life Systems, Models, and Machines

2:00-2:15             Joffrey Becker (Collège de France/Paris Sciences-Lettres University)

Introduction: CyberPhysical Systems

2:15-2:30              Yadi Wang (University of Arizona)

Soil genesis in LEO artificial hillsopes

2:30-2:45              Elsa Abs (ENS/Paris Sciences-Lettres University & Univ. Arizona)

Modeling the soil-atmosphere connection by evolving microbes

2:45-3:00              Coffee break

3:00-3:15              Leah Aronowsky (Harvard University)

Multispecies Spaceflight

3:15-3:30              Boris Sauterey (ENS/Paris Sciences-Lettres University)

Modeling the co-evolution of ecosystems and planet habitability

3:30-3:45              Blair Bainbridge (University of Chicago)

Life in the Great Silence

3:45-4:30             Roundtable discussion with Greg Barron-Gafford (School of Geography and Development and Biosphere 2, University of Arizona) and workshop presenters and organizers.

Posters on display by Greg Barron-Gafford (U. Arizona), Erana Loveless (U. Arizona), Katarena Matos (U. Arizona), Antonio Meira Neto (U. Arizona), Aditi Sengupta (U. Arizona).

Day 2 (Friday, February 2) will bring together astronomers and planetary scientists, environmental biologists, anthropologists and philosophers to tackle the questions of what counts as the “human environment”, what it means to be in the world, and how we comprehend Earth in its globality, in the light of observation and exploration of distant spaces that revolutionize our understanding of the universe.

Location: LOWER HABITAT

9:00-10:00           Coffee / Ice breaker / School students meet speakers

10:00-10:10        Opening remarks by Dean Joaquin Ruiz (UA Biosphere 2)

10:10-10:50        Valerie Olson (UC Irvine, Anthropology)

Ecosystems as Objects of Study and Collaboration: Lessons from the Ethnographic Field

10:50-11:30        Dante Lauretta (UA, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory)

Planetary Exploration and Our Understanding of Life

11:30-11:50        Discussion

11:50-12:30        Break

12:30-1:10           Marcia Rieke (UA, Astronomy)

Characterizing Exoplanets: What Do We Know?

1:10-1:50              Istvan Praet (University of London at Roehampton, Anthropology)

Petri dishes, Islands and Planets. Astrobiology and the Modelling of Biospheres

1:50-2:10              Discussion

2:10-2:50              Lisa Messeri (Yale University, Anthropology)

Being Elsewhere: Analog Fieldwork and the Planetary Imagination

2:50-3:30              Chris Impey (UA, Astronomy)

Our Future in Space

3:30-4:00              Discussion and closing

After workshop ends, participants may consider visiting the Kuiper LPL Art of Planetary Science on UA main campus, 5:00-9:00 PM. The exhibit continues on February 3 and 4, 1-5PM. More information at https://www.sites.google.com/site/lpltaps/

 

Publicités

« PRÉSENCES EXTRATERRESTRES » – THE THING – 17 JANVIER 2018 – 20H

Bonjour à tous et toutes,

Meilleurs voeux pour cette nouvelle année.

Le cycle « Présences extraterrestres », organisé par R. Lehoucq, J.S.
Sébastien Steyer et moi-même, reprend avec « The Thing » de Carpenter le 17 janvier à 20H. 
La discussion qui suivra sera animée par Barbara Le Maître et François Moutou. Comme la dernière fois, il reste encore des invitations à retirer en écrivant à ocavbioarti@gmail.com
Bien à vous,

Perig Pitrou

--OCAV_MAIL

APPEL À COMMUNICATION – ATELIER INTERNATIONAL BIOCOSMOS – 1 & 2 FÉVRIER 2018, BIOSPHÈRE 2

CNRS-ENS-UA International Research Center iGLOBES
and
Paris Sciences & Lettres Research University Interdisciplinary Program on Origin and Conditions of Appearance of Life

« BIOCOSMOS – Our Sense of Place, Our Sense of Life in the Universe”

Workshop organized by Dr. Perig Pitrou (Collège de France/PSL Research University, Paris), Dr. Istvan Praet (University of Roehampton, London), Dr. Regis Ferriere (University of Arizona and ENS/PSL Research University, Paris) and Dr. Kevin Bonine (Biosphere 2, University of Arizona)
February 1-2, 2018
at Biosphere 2 (Oracle, Arizona)

Download the call for participation

Planet scientists and exoplanet astronomers are re-shaping our understanding of the universe, presenting a fascinating cosmos filled with places and destinations, not an empty void. At the same time, Earth physicists and biologists design models of self-sustainable ecosystems such as Biosphere 2 and the Mars/Lunar Greenhouse, with the goal of engineering bio-regenerative mini-worlds that can function on their own. As these scientific revolutions unfold, with distant spaces and global life systems as objects of “field work”, what counts as the “human environment”? How do we, as individuals and societies, relate to spaces, things, and processes we do not or cannot experience directly and which we see as “extreme” or “beyond” human? As scientists study these distant spaces and global processes, how do their findings transform our understanding of what it means to be in the world? How do inquiry and insight change our outer space imagination and the way we comprehend Earth on a whole, planetary scale? Will all this impact how our societies confront today’s environmental challenges?

Tackling these big questions requires off-the-beaten-path dialogue among anthropologists, space scientists, and Earth system researchers. To promote this conversation, the International Research Center iGLOBES (CNRS-UA-ENS UMI 3157) and Paris Sciences & Lettres Research University organize a two-day workshop at Biosphere 2, on February 1-2, 2018.

Day 1 (Thursday, February 1) will be devoted to the question of how we, humans, use our perception and understanding of life and nature on global Earth to design, engineer and use ‘mini-worlds’ – miniaturized artificial ecosystems that can function on their own and help us meet some of our most pressing global challenges, such as food production, climate control, clean water, and safe energy beyond current environmental or economic limits.

Confirmed speakers: John Adams (UA Biosphere 2), Gene Giacomelli (UA Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering), Perig Pitrou (Social Anthropology, PSL/CNRS-Collège de France), Peter Troch (UA Hydrology & Biosphere 2).

A dedicated Doctoral and Post-Doctoral Session, moderated by Joffrey Becker (PSL/Collège de France) will bring together participants from multiple disciplines (biology, ecology, planetary science, computer and data sciences, applied mathematics, engineering, anthropology, philosophy…) who are concerned with the question: What fondamental elements and which interactions allow us to consider that a world can be inhabited, a world in which life systems can evolve and maintain themselves? The session will focus on issues directly related to cybernetic systems, considering them as both a mean to represent (model) ecosystems emerging on Earth and potentially elsewhere in the universe, but also as a mean to design and construct artificial devices where terrestrial life can self-sustain in a contained environment and thus survive outside the Earth. In the philosophical perspective, we will try to better understand how cybernetic systems, through the mediation of theoretical or real machines, shed light on the complex (and culturally informed) entanglements of life and techniques.

 

Day 2 (Friday, February 2, 9am-5pm) will bring together astronomers and planetary scientists, environmental biologists, anthropologists and philosophers to tackle the questions of what counts as the “human environment”, what it means to be in the world, and how we comprehend Earth in its globality, in the light of observation and exploration of distant spaces that revolutionize our understanding of the universe.

Confirmed speakers: Marcia Rieke (Astronomy, University of Arizona), Chris Impey (Astronomy, University of Arizona), Dante Lauretta (Astronomy, University of Arizona), Lisa Messeri (Anthropology, Yale University), Valerie Olson (Antropology, UC Irvine), Istvan Praet (Anthropology, University of Roehampton, London). Opening remarks by Joaquin Ruiz, Dean of the College of Science and Biosphere 2 Director.

After workshop ends, participants may consider visiting the Kuiper LPL Art of Planetary Science on UA main campus, 5:00-9:00 PM. The exhibit continues on February 3 and 4, 1-5PM. More information at https://www.sites.google.com/site/lpltaps/

Registration – The number of participants is limited to 25 on Day 1. Day 2 is open to the public but registration (free) is requested. Please register by sending an email to ocavbioarti@gmail.com with the following information

  • –  Your name, affiliation, email address
  • –  Participation in Day 1 (Feb 1)? Day 2 (Feb 2)? Both?
  • –  For graduate students and postdoctoral researchers: If you are applying to contribute a presentation to the Doctoral and Postdoctoral Session on Day 1, please specify:

    o Oral presentation? Poster? Both?
    o Title(s) of the presentation(s) and short abstract(s).
    o If applicable, a list of selected publications, relevant to the topic of your contribution(s).
    o A short bio or résumé.

SÉMINAIRE « ANTHROPOLOGIE DE LA VIE ET DES REPRÉSENTATIONS DU VIVANT » – PROGRAMME 2017-2018

Chers et chères collègues, chers et chères étudiant.e.s,

Le séminaire « Anthropologie de la vie et des représentations du vivant » reprend à partir du 9 novembre – avec un changement d’horaire par rapport à celui précédemment indiqué (voir ci-dessous).

Ce séminaire est ouvert à tous.

Perig Pitrou – Laboratoire d’anthropologie sociale / Pépinière interdisciplinaire CNRS-PSL « Domestication et fabrication du vivant »
(https://domesticationetfabricationduvivant.wordpress.com)

http://las.ehess.fr/index.php?1715
https://cnrs-gif.academia.edu/PerigPitrou

Anthropologie de la vie et des représentations du vivant

Jeudi de 9 h à 11 h (salle 5, 105 bd Raspail 75006 Paris), du 9 novembre 2017 au 8 février 2018. La séance du 30 novembre se déroulera exceptionnellement de 11 h à 13 h (salle 1, même adresse)

 La contribution de l’anthropologie américaniste à la définition de la vie (Mésoamérique, Andes, Amazonie)

Les récentes avancées scientifiques et technologiques suscitent des changements profonds dans les relations que les humains entretiennent avec le vivant et dans leurs conceptions de la vie. Par conséquent, les problèmes soulevés par la question des frontières entre le vivant et le non-vivant et par la définition de la vie concernent les sciences humaines et sociales et pas simplement la biologie. Même si, par définition, cette dernière fait de la vie un objet spécifique d’investigation, les humains n’ont pas attendu son développement, somme toute assez récent, pour s’interroger sur les causes produisant des phénomènes tels que la croissance, la reproduction, la régénération, la sénescence et la mort – pour ne prendre que quelques exemples – qu’ils observent dans leur corps ou dans le monde végétal et animal. Il y a même là un enjeu fondamental pour toutes les sociétés : individuellement et collectivement, les humains tentent d’exercer une action sur ces processus afin de les contrôler ou de les influencer favorablement, comme c’est le cas dans les pratiques agricoles ou médicales. La manière d’aborder le vivant et d’agir sur lui se révèle donc indissociable de contextes socioculturels. Dans ce cadre, ce séminaire souhaite montrer qu’en même temps que les investigations menées dans le monde occidental, en particulier dans le domaine des STS, l’ethnologie des sociétés amérindiennes (Mésoamérique, Andes et Amazonie) peut contribuer à la réélaboration du concept de vie. Après avoir rappelé les principaux problèmes épistémologiques que doit traiter l’anthropologie de la vie – et les options théoriques disponibles pour s’engager dans une démarche comparatiste – on abordera les différentes ordres de faits à partir desquels les théories amérindiennes de la vie peuvent être mises en évidence : rites de naissance, traitements du corps et activités thérapeutiques, activités techniques (poterie, architecture, sculpture, etc.) et pratiques productives (agriculture, élevage, chasse, etc.), modélisations des systèmes écologiques et organisations (cosmo)biopolitiques.

Jeudi 9 novembre : L’anthropologie de la vie, un projet comparatiste (Articles Current Anthropology & L’Homme joints)

Jeudi 16 novembre : Ethnographier les théories de la vie dans le monde amérindien

Jeudi 23 novembre : Mésoamérique

Jeudi 30 novembre (Attention : séance de 11h à 13h, salle 1) : Mésoamérique

Jeudi 7 décembre : Andes

Jeudi 14 décembre : Andes

Jeudi 21 décembre : Amazonie

Jeudi 11 janvier : Amazonie

Jeudi 18 janvier : Contribution de l’ethnographie amérindienne à la définition de la vie

Jeudi 25 janvier : Séance spéciale autour de l’animisme (avec Istvan Praet)

Jeudi 1 février : programme à confirmer

Jeudi 8 février : programme à confirmer

CYCLE DE PROJECTIONS « PRÉSENCES EXTRATERRESTRES », NOVEMBRE 2017 – JUIN 2018 AU CINÉMA LE GRAND ACTION

Chers et chères collègues,

J’ai le plaisir de vous transmettre le programme d’un  cycle de huit films-débats que j’organise avec Roland Lehoucq et Jean-Sébastien Steyer autour de la thématique de la vie extraterrestre au cinéma Le Grand Action (5, rue des Ecoles à Paris) . Je vous joins, ci-dessous, le texte de présentation, programme et un poster .

Lors de la  première séance,  le 15 novembre à 20H00, nous présenterons « Rencontres du troisième type » de S. Spielberg (séance suivie d’un cocktail). La séance est publique, il est donc possible d’y accéder avec des cartes d’abonnement ou en achetant des places. Nous aurons également quelques dizaines d’invitations; n’hésitez pas à écrire à l’adresse [ocavbioarti@gmail.com] si vous souhaitez en recevoir une (dans la limite des places disponibles…).

Cette programmation, financée par Paris Sciences et Lettres, s’inscrit dans le cadre d’un projet interdisciplinaire (IRIS), porté par l’Observatoire de Paris, qui réfléchit aux « Origines et conditions d’apparition de la vie » (http://www.univ-psl-ocav.fr).

Bien cordialement,

Perig Pitrou
Anthropologue, CNRS/PSL/Collège de France

PRÉSENCES EXTRATERRESTRES
DIVERSITÉ DES FORMES DE VIE EN SCIENCE-FICTION
8 FILMS-DÉBATS

Télécharger l’affiche

Programmation proposée par Roland Lehoucq, Perig Pitrou & J.-Sébastien Steyer dans le cadre du projet Paris Sciences et Lettres:
ORIGINES ET CONDITIONS D’APPARITION DE LA VIE
NOVEMBRE 2017 – JUIN 2018
Cinéma Le Grand Action – 5, rue des Écoles, Paris 5e

--OCAV_MAIL

EXISTE-T-IL UNE VIE EXTRATERRESTRE ? La question demeure, tant les distances spatiales et temporelles rendent difficile l’exploration du nombre grandissant d’exoplanètes découvertes dans notre voisinage. Alors que les sciences de la nature – en particulier dans le domaine de l’exobiologie – doivent s’armer de patience lorsqu’elles cherchent à déterminer l’origine et les conditions d’apparition de la vie, la science-fiction qui offre la possibilité de s’affranchir de certaines contraintes matérielles et scientifiques, imagine sans relâche l’extrême diversité des formes que pourraient prendre les vies extraterrestres. D’innombrables films mettent ainsi en scène la découverte d’autres mondes par des humains explorant l’espace, voire décrivent des sociétés non-humaines régies selon des lois – naturelles et sociales – radicalement différentes des nôtres.

Il n’est toutefois pas toujours nécessaire de parcourir l’espace pour rencontrer des extraterrestres, comme le montrent d’autres films qui envisagent leur présence sur notre planète. Arrivés seuls ou en groupe, avec des motivations – pacifiques ou franchement agressives – parfois difficiles à identifier, venus pour s’installer ou, au contraire, pour repartir, l’apparition d’extraterrestres sur Terre suscite de nombreuses interrogations. Quelles sont leurs caractéristiques biologiques et l’état de leur développement technologique ? Représentent-ils une menace ou, au contraire, viennent-ils délivrer des messages utiles au progrès et à la survie de l’humanité ? Comment apprendre à communiquer et à coexister avec eux et, le cas échéant, comment se défendre contre les dangers qu’ils représentent ? Autant de questions qui soulignent que, par-delà la représentation de formes vivantes inédites, le cinéma de science-fiction invite à réfléchir à la diversité des interactions que les humains établissent avec des êtres qui semblent, de prime abord, si dissemblables.

Avant d’explorer – l’an prochain – la représentation des extraterrestres sur d’autres planètes, ce cycle de 8 films-débats invite à réfléchir, en compagnie de chercheurs en sciences physiques, en sciences naturelles et en sciences humaines et sociales, à la diversité des formes que prennent, dans notre imaginaire, les vies extraterrestres sur Terre.

15 novembre 2017, 20h00

RENCONTRES DU TROISIÈME TYPE, S. Spielberg,
Discussion animée par R. Lehoucq (CEA), F. Marchis (SETI Institute) et S. Mazevet (Observatoire de Paris/ PSL) – Séance suivie d’un cocktail –

13 décembre 2017, 20h00

LE JOUR OÙ LA TERRE S’ARRÊTA, R. Wise,
Discussion animée par P. Pitrou (CNRS/PSL) & W. Stoczkowski (EHESS/PSL)

17 janvier 2018, 20h00

THE THING, J. Carpenter
Discussion animée par B. Le Maître (Univ. Paris Nanterre) & F. Moutou (ANSES)

14 février 2018, 20h00

PACIFIC RIM, G. del Toro
Discussion animée par R. Lehoucq (CEA) & J.-S. Steyer (CNRS/MNHN)

14 mars 2018, 20h00

DISTRICT 9, N. Blomkamp,
Discussion animée par A. Musset (EHESS/PSL) & J.-S. Steyer (CNRS/MNHN)

11 avril 2018, 20h00

UNDER THE SKIN, Jonathan Glazer,
Discussion animée par É. Bapteste (CNRS) & P. -L. Patoine (Univ. Sorbonne-Nouvelle)

16 mai 2018, 20h00

MIDNIGHT SPECIAL, J. Nichols,
Discussion animée par P. Pitrou (CNRS/PSL) & A. Esquerre (CNRS)

26 juin 2018, 20h00

PREMIER CONTACT, D. Villeneuve,
(entrée libre, sur réservation)
Discussion animée par R. Lehoucq (CEA) & V. Vapnarsky (CNRS) – Séance suivie d’un cocktail –

LE GRAND ACTION, 5, rue des Écoles, Paris 5e www.legrandaction.com

Tarifs : 9.50€ (plein) / 7.50€ (réduit) / 6€ (-26 ans) / Cartes UGC illimitées et CIP acceptées

Pour toute information contacter : ocavbioarti@gmail.com
Site PSL – Origines et conditions d’apparition de la vie : http://www.univ-psl-ocav.fr/